Yarn Along

2013-12-04 10.28.29

As promised, this is the Koigu scarf that I started back in June of this year.  I was inspired to pick it up again this week by the mini-slog currently underway on the Coldsheeping boards, as members try to get as many of their works-in-progress completed before the end of the year.   This scarf pattern is designed to mix in several different colourways of Koigu KPPPM but I chose to use three balls of the same colourway that I bought at the DKC Frolic in Toronto.  The yarn is lovely and bouncy and the linen stitch looks great, but the gauge is a bit tough on my hands so I can’t work on it for long periods of time.

I just finished reading Knitting the Threads of Time: Casting Back to the Heart of our Craft.  It is a hard book to describe, a combination of a look back at the history of textiles and knitting with the story of the author’s journey through knitting her son a sweater.  There is a lot of discussion of the spiritual meaning in knitting, which might put some readers off.  Overall I enjoyed the book, although I found the author’s emphasis on the “sisterhood” of knitting a little exclusive.  Certainly any male knitter would have a hard time connecting to the narrative as written.  The history was very interesting however, and I personally liked her spiritual musings.

On the same vein, I just started reading Women’s Work: The First 20,000 Years.  This is a very accessible academic work written by an archaeologist and weaver. The book looks at the very early history of textiles and women’s work, so she doesn’t touch much on knitting (that didn’t show up until the last 1000 years or so).  It focuses entirely on women (duh, see the title), but since it is an academic work and based on archaeological evidence (and since archaeological work on women’s interests is sadly lacking) I don’t find it off-putting like I did in the other book.  I’m still in the Stone Age section, but so far I’m finding it entertaining as well as enlightening.

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